Different designated user communities are addressed through the preservation objective defined
above. Earth Observation data users are today, as an example and among others, Scientists and
Principal Investigators, researchers, commercial entities, value adders, and general public. These
communities can be further differentiated on the basis of the respective application domain and
area of interest (e.g. ocean, atmosphere) and generally have different skills, resources and
knowledge.

.

 

.

.

SCIDIP-ES Interactive Platform

Our service and toolkits can be used and downloaded from our interactive platform

MORE >

SCIDIP-ES Training

Follow the link to see past project training videos on digital data preservation

MORE >

SCIDIP-ES FOR SCIENTISTS

Different designated user communities are addressed through the preservation objective defined
above. Earth Observation data users are today, as an example and among others, Scientists and
Principal Investigators, researchers, commercial entities, value adders, and general public. These
communities can be further differentiated on the basis of the respective application domain and
area of interest (e.g. ocean, atmosphere) and generally have different skills, resources and
knowledge.

Scientists demand for Earth Science data interoperability has raisen in the last decades. Volcanologists may need to integrate satellite data into their studies on volcanoes or plate tectonics. An Earth Observation expert may need to use oceanography data to compare satellite global measurements with in situ experiments.  We use the term "designated communities" to define these groups of data users and define their needs. 

Knowing who is going to use your data and his/her background allows you define with more precision what kind of information or software he/her may need now or in the future to properly understand and use data he/her is could be not familiar with.

SCIDIP-ES development of services and toolkits and the work we are carrying on data access and data preservation harmonization in the Earth Science domain is exactly seeking this objective: to allow present and future generation of scientists to understand and exploit data they may be not directly famliar with, in an easy and efficient way.